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For many years as an educator and director I was a firm believer in defending my practice and that of my service. When an assessor challenged our use of glass jars I defended the decision, providing positive examples and research. When a parent questioned the legalities of tree climbing I directed them to our benefit risk assessment, found articles, research and safety information to back us up. When an educator said “we’re not allowed to do that” I found regulations, made phone calls and got out the highlighter!

As a consultant I have often encouraged educators to defend what they do and while I still feel that way, a discussion with Tash (Inspired EC co-founder) this morning had me questioning whether it should always be up to educators to defend what they do. Instead, I would suggest that educators should feel empowered to question their challengers. Instead of having to prove ourselves… let’s turn the tables!

When an assessor challenges your practice and says “you can’t do that” ask to be shown where the in the National Quality Framework it says that you can​​ ​’t.

When another educator says “we’re not allowed to do that” ask them to find the regulation or law that says that.

Why should it be up to us to always defend what we do? If someone is putting an obstacle in the way of us providing opportunities for children (such as excursions) or creating an inspiring environment (by adding a trickle stream, for example) then they need to provide us with the hard facts – not just “Oh, I heard from Jane, who works at xyz service, that the assessor said it wasn’t allowed.”​

Of course there will inevitably be times when someone (assessor, colleague) actually identifies an issue that we have missed and that is great – when they come to us with hard facts, we are able to swiftly make appropriate change to ensure the best outcomes for children.

Don’t dread the visits from the regulatory authority, they are a great opportunity – just be prepared to ask the question “can you show me where that is written in the National Quality Framework?”​​
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Last week I left the office and decided to go for a walk around the lake. I set off and although the flies were enough to drive me crazy, the quiet and the view of the boats was just the relaxation I needed. I had walked quite a distance when I was hit by a smell. It wasn’t a bad smell, nor would I say it was a good smell. But it was a familiar smell. It wasn’t something that I smell every day and I really couldn’t (and still can’t – although it was some type of tree!) put my finger on what it was, but one whiff and I was instantly taken back to my childhood. I felt as though I were 5 years old again. This then evoked memories of my preschool – a breezy, light filled, warm, open place that I loved. That smell bought back images of my teachers, memories of playing on the huge timber fort, the three coloured balloons that told me that was my locker and my hand towel in the bathroom, even the time that one of my friends wet the bed (those old hessian stretcher beds) at rest time!

How is it that this one smell bought back such happy memories?
Technically speaking, it all comes down to the brain. The olfactory bulb in the brain is part of the limbic system, an area often referred to as the “emotional brain” and is closely linked to the amygdala, which processes emotion, and the hippocampus, which is responsible for associative learning​​​. The reason that smells trigger emotional responses or memories is due to our tendency to link a smell to an event or person or moment when we first smell it. And the reason we tend to be taken back to childhood? This is often the time when we experience a smell for the very first time.

This isn’t the first time a smell has triggered an early childhood memory for me and I am sure it won’t be the last. Whenever I smell a vegemite sandwich I am taken back to preschool! But for some reason, when this happened last week it made me think about what smells will evoke memories for children in care right now. So many services that I visit are sterile environments – often there is an overuse of Glen20. So in 20years when children smell latex gloves or Glen20 or disinfectant… they will be transformed back to childhood. I don’t think I like the sound of that.

In addition to the memory effect, smells also have the ability to impact on our moods and wellbeing. Research shows that smell can affect ​blood sugar levels, concentration and stress levels and our health. Therefore, it is crucial that we give thought to the smells our children experience in our care. Do they have the opportunity to smell trees, fresh cut grass or food cooking away? If we need to use items for cleaning or making unpleasant smells disappear, do we give thought to what we use?

Spend some time “sniffing” in your service and ask yourself… are these the smells that will positively impact on mood, health and children’s memories?

By Nicole Halton​​

Are you trying to make your environment calmer, healthier and smelling better? Did you know we stock doTERRA natural oils?​


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I have many pet peeves. Anyone who knows me well knows that there a lots of things that drive me crazy – things not being put back where they belong, crumbs in the butter, that kind of thing! But there is a phrase that I have heard too many times in my Early Childhood career and it really drives me bonkers… “they need to learn to do that, they will have to do it next year at school” 

Now this phrase (or variants of it) is often used when discussing things such as:
  • Sitting for group time
  • Lining up
  • Putting their hand up to talk
  • Sitting on the floor with legs crossed


What frustrates me about this is that these, while being perfectly possible for some children, are really unrealistic expectations for many four year olds. As educators we know that many four year olds love to run, jump, climb, twirl, skip, bounce and just generally be active, yet there seems to be a lingering expectation that when we say “It’s group time”, these active children will be able to just shelve that need to move and suddenly sit still for up to half an hour! 

A recent discussion with a passionate EC professional highlighted this issue for me once again and she made a really valid point – we don’t say “hey they are in year four, but we better make them do year 5 work so that they are used to it for next year”  

Yes, it is important for children to feel “ready” for school… but maybe the schools need to play a part in this too and be ready for these children – as they are! The downward push of assessing and formal, structured learning is disappointing and frustrating. From an early age, learning is becoming more about sitting and listening, sitting and writing, sitting and reading. What happened to doing? What happened to learning by using our senses? Howard Gardner identified the different types of learning styles and I feel that in many ways, we in Early Childhood have become great at adapting our approach and environment to accommodate these. Yet unfortunately in many (not all – I know there are some great one’s out there!!) four year old/preschool rooms, these seem to get thrown out the window as we madly try to prepare the children for school. School readiness is a sore point with me (and a whole other blog post!) so I won’t delve to deeply into it, but I really think that as educators we need to advocate for change in the Early Years of school. We need to defend children’s rights to be active, to learn through play and to just simply be kids! 

The first step in that is to stop saying “they need to learn to do that, they will have to do it next year at school” Instead, let’s embrace the now! Let’s focus on the children we have in front of us, not the children that will be completely different people in 6 months or 12 months. And who’s to say that the child who is wriggling and rolling and playing with their shoelaces isn’t listening and isn’t learning? Surely disrupting the whole group to ask them to sit still 14 times during the story is not going to benefit them or the other children? We can get so caught up in trying to prepare children for the next step, that we forget to just slow down and appreciate what they can do, what they know and who they are right now. 


Embrace the now!
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I love the Internet. I love that I can find out anything about everything (thank you Google). I love that I can keep in touch with friends and family. I love that I can browse through thousands of images and websites in my quest for the perfect doll” and I love that I can network with other Early Childhood Professionals.

Over the last few months that last one has become something I do more of. I am a follower of many great blogs and have joined various Facebook groups designed for sharing ideas, supporting one another and reflecting on our practice. That sounds great in theory, but it would seem that a positive and reflective online group is becoming hard to find! In recent weeks I have seen arguments that have spiraled into name calling and at times downright nastiness. In the last few days I have seen many passionate educators leave these groups, taking with them valid ideas and opinions. I find this really sad.

Don’t get me wrong – I love a good debate! I actually think it is totally appropriate and good for our profession to have debates about key issues. How else do we evolve if we aren’t able to reflect on our opinions and practices or if we aren’t challenged by others who are as passionate as ourselves? I have had some great professional disagreements online and “in real life” and have always walked away learning something. And really – how boring would the world be if everyone agreed with me? (although sometimes I wish they would!!)

So if you are going to use these networking groups (and I suggest you do!) below are the four rules that I would recommend imposing on yourself in order to stay sane!

I would really like to elaborate on the second and fourth point.

I am a passionate advocate and I will never back down or apologise for that. When you have a strong belief or understanding that is supported by theory, research or regulations and someone is doing something that contradicts that and is detrimental to children, you have an obligation to speak up. When I read about someone leaving an educator alone in a room with children – I speak up. When someone says that you will “get in trouble” during assessment if the children climb trees – I speak up. I always try to do this nicely and to back up what I am saying with regulations, law or research.

As I said before, I love a good debate, but there are times when it is just not worth having an argument. Sometimes, for whatever reason, there are people who just want to get into a fight. Maybe they have had a bad day, maybe it is a particularly sensitive issue for them personally or maybe they just want to argue! I think unless you have something productive or purposeful to contribute…just keep on scrolling. If someone says something nasty… just keep on scrolling. I’m not saying we should necessarily back down – I believe it is important to stand up for yourself and to hold people accountable for their actions and attitudes, but sometimes it is just not worth the stress to engage!

Social networking isn’t going to go away – so we may as well make the most of it and view it as an opportunity to grow as a professional and to build a community of passionate, opinionated individuals!
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